Ruinart Rosé Champagne NV (6 x 750mL), Champagne, France.

Liquor Act 2007: It is against the law to sell or supply alcohol to, or to obtain alcohol on behalf of, a person under the age of 18 years. Liquor licence LIQP770010049

RRP $112.49

$99.99 per Bottle
$599.94 per pack
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With its very recognisable bottle from the 18th Century, Ruinart Rosé takes on a charming springtime colour of delicate pomegranate rosé with very light orange reflections. The sparkling, light effervescence has a persistent ring of beads.

FRA - Champagne

Expert Reviews

Strawberry/cherry, a little spice, aniseed, roses – it’s what you might call a red wine-like style. Soft and fluffy with ripe fruit, though not sweet, a fine tingling bubble and cherry fruited finish. Vinous and flavoursome. Great to drink too. A beautiful wine to my tastes. Rating 94 - Drink by 2018, Gary Walsh, (NOV/2012).

Winery Tasting Notes


The first olfactory notes allow the smooth aromas of freshly gathered red fruit (cherry, raspberry and wild strawberry) to develop, adorned with soft floral and exuberant tropical fruit fragrances (rose, pomegranate, lychee and guava) and sharpened by several spicy notes (tonka bean and nutmeg).


A fine, supple, rounded silky wine with intense generous notes of red fruits, gentle spices enlivened with a touch of mint for a long bold finish.

Food Matching

Ruinart Rosé is a truly festive champagne, which is a delight to drink throughout a meal from aperitif to dessert. It will be enhanced by thin slices of fine Italian prosciutto (San Daniele, Parma, etc.). A starter of mi-cuit salmon, or salmon prepared as a Japanese “tataki”, will reveal its many facets. For a main course, it will be an admirable accompaniment for a leg of milk-fed lamb or a low temperature cooked veal fillet. At the end of the meal it will find its full expression with a berry soup enhanced with an excellent Modena balsamic vinegar.

FRA - Champagne
Grape Style
Closure Type
Cork closure

Winery Profile

Brand Profile Image

Frédric Panaïotis grew up between his grandparent’s chardonnay vines in Champagne and chardonnay remains close to his heart, making him right at home as chef de cave at Ruinart. The longest established champagne house of all has an affinity with chardonnay’s freshness, finesse and elegance, and all of its best cuvées lead with the variety, even its prestige rosé. Without the might of Moët & Chandon, the brand impact of Veuve Clicquot or the cachet of Krug, Ruinart lurks as the low profile member of the Louis Vuitton-Moët Hennessy family. On Reim’s famed Rue de Crayères, its premises hides behind the grand street presence of Pommery and Veuve Clicquot. Its low profile is just as Panaïotis would have it. “In France we have a saying, if you live underground, you live happy!” he says. But on the strength of its current cuvées, Ruinart has no need to lay low.

Champagne is planted to just twenty-eight percent chardonnay, making this the rarest of the region’s threekey varieties, and the most difficult to source. Ruinart owns just ten percent of its vineyards, includinglongstanding resources of fifteen hectares of chardonnay at Sillery and Puisieulx on the eastern slopes of theMontagne de Reims, providing a richer and rounder style than the Côte des Blancs. Long-term contracts withgrowers form the vast bulk of Ruinart’s supplies, supplemented in recent times through vineyards acquiredfrom Lanson and Joseph Perrier. This has enabled the house to increase its annual production from 1.4million to more than 2.5 million bottles over the past two decades.

Ruinart’s distinctive rounded bottles make riddling challenging and the house relies exclusively on gyropalettes, which Panaïotis claims give a better result by far. The clear glass of these bottles makes the wine susceptible to lightstruck degradation, making it vital that they are stored in the dark.

Ruinart has occupied its premises in Reims since 1768 and it was the first in Champagne to use the third century Roman Crayères (chalk mines) under the city to age its champagnes. Its location on top of the hill make its eight kilometres of cellars some of the deepest and most spectacular in Champagne, plunging to depths of up to thirty-eight metres. These are the only cellars in Champagne classified as a national monument. A distinguished home for such graceful champagnes.


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